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Reducing Your Carbon Footprint

In 2008, Carbon Dioxide was considered a major greenhouse gas – accounting for 85 per cent of UK emissions.  According to the Freight Transport Association (FTA) support guide, if we want to reduce the risk of temperatures rising by at least 2° C by 2100, we need to cut emissions in half by 2050.

Whether you drive a car, van, truck or a motorbike, there are loads of simple changes you can make which can help to reduce your carbon footprint:

Within the freight sector, there are ‘smart logistics’ available in the form of telematics – which we’ve discussed previously in our blog as the future of driving.  The telematics system collects data from a GPS, a sensor on the engine and an accelerometer.  The sensor notes vehicle health data such as fuel economy, service needs and carbon dioxide output.  This allows companies to work out if they need new electric vehicle technology, which in turn would reduce carbon output drastically.  This technology will also highlight the vehicles that are no longer fuel efficient.  It is worth installing a telematics system in your vehicle so you too can do your bit for the environment.

The Logistics Carbon Reduction Scheme is an industry-led approach endorsed by the FTA, looking to reduce carbon emissions from freight transport.  The scheme offers benefits to operators with cost reduction and efficiency improvements and there are annual reports on the progress of the participants.  The five efficiency indicators include fuel efficiency improvements, better commercial vehicle utilisation, use of alternative low-carbon fuels, less carbon intensive supply chains and use of low carbon transport modes.  This type of scheme could have a hugely positive impact on how logistics are managed in the future.

Whether you run a business or just run your own private car, the most obvious solution is to go straight to the source, and that’s the type of fuel you use.  Whatever vehicle you drive, why not opt for green fuel types?  If you have a petrol vehicle you could have it altered so it can run on LPG (liquid petroleum gas) which is used in camping stoves.  The conversion may be pricey but the benefits outweigh the costs when you’ve got a car that runs on cheap fuel.  The option for a diesel user is biodiesel, made from recycled vegetable oil.

The simplest and easiest way to help reduce your carbon footprint is to adapt to an efficient driving habit that is eco-friendly.  For example, don’t go beyond the speed limit to avoid emitting extra CO2 into the environment; this goes hand in hand with being safe on the road too.

Whatever road you choose to take, make sure it involves a reduced carbon footprint!

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